Thursday, March 12, 2020

Political and social effects that shaped the 60s generation essays

Political and social effects that shaped the 60s generation essays Massive black rebellions, constant strikes, gigantic anti-war demonstrations, draft resistance, Cuba, Vietnam, Algeria, a cultural revolution of seven hundred million Chinese, occupations, red power, the rising of women, disobedience and sabotage, communes they were thought of as being pot smoking, freeloading vagabonds, who were trying to save the world. As this small pocket of teenage rebellion rose out of the suburbs, inner cities, and countrysides, there was a general feeling that the hippies were a product of drugs, and rock music; this generalization could have never been more wrong. The hippie counterculture was more than just a product of drugs and music, but a result of the change that was sweeping the entire western world. These changes were brought about by various events in both the fifties and the sixties, such as: the end of the "Golden Years" of the fifties, the changing economical state from the fifties to the sixties, the Black Panther Party, women moving into the w ork force, the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and John F. Kennedy Jr., the war in Vietnam, the Kent State protest, and finally the Woodstock festival. The electric subcurrent of the fifties was, above all, rocknroll, the live wire that linked bedazzled teenagers around the nation, and quickly around the world, into the common enterprise of being young. Rock was rough, raw, insistent, especially by comparison with the music it replaced; it whooped and groaned, shook, rattled, and rolled. Rock was clamor, the noise of youth submerged by order and prosperity, now frantically clawing their way out. The winds of change began to sweep across America in...

Monday, February 24, 2020

BHE 314 Mod 4 SLP Environmental Health and Safety Essay

BHE 314 Mod 4 SLP Environmental Health and Safety - Essay Example In the result, bacteria, parasites, and different germs are mixed with beach water, which results in different illnesses. Individuals with diarrhea and vomiting problems are one of the major causes of water contamination. Secondly, it is noted that irregular bowel movements of children are also a major cause of contamination of beach waters. (WHO, 2003) Another main factor that contributes to beach water contamination is sewage water that mixes in the beach water and results in millions of bacteria in the water. Feces and urine are some of the components of human waste that consist in sewage water. Although the United States has effective sewage treatment plans; however, network of pipes often malfunctions and results in the leakage of such contaminated water in recreational waters and beaches. Studies have indicated that a waterborne protozoan, Cryptosporidium parvum emerges in after contaminated sewage-water mixes in beach waters. Even after much advancement in innovative scientific methods, it is very difficult to eliminate the emergence of abovementioned protozoan from water, which causes a number of waterborne diseases. In the year 2000, existence of abovementioned bacterium affected hundreds of U.S. residents that visited recreational water beaches. In the month of July 2001, the same bacterium affected more than fifty-two people that were exposed with the same protozoan at a recreational beach. (WHO, 2003) Every year, hundreds of complaints are registered regarding the waterborne illnesses that are caused after visiting recreational water facilities in different parts of the country, and therefore, it is important that effective steps should be taken to eliminate the factors that cause such contamination. Experts have indicated that humans are exposed with contaminated water in recreational beaches through different routes. During swimming, swimmers accidentally drink contaminated water that

Saturday, February 8, 2020

Antigone Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 5750 words

Antigone - Essay Example This study looks into â€Å"Antigone† by Sophocles that is about Antigone’s struggles with what she thinks is right versus what Creon believes is right. They have differences in what morality is about and who should define it. The play depicts the conflict between serving the state’s authority and observing one’s family duties. Creon makes a law that prevents Polyneices from having a proper burial, because he is a traitor to Thebes. He declares: Him I decree that none should dare entomb, That none should utter wail or loud lament, But leave his corpse unburied, by the dogs And vultures mangled, foul to look upon. Antigone, however, is willing to defy the king, so that she can bury Polyneices. For her, her family duties come first before her duties as a citizen. She reinforces her belief to Ismene, who tries to stop her in disobeying Creon: â€Å"At least he is my brother-and yours, too,†¦ I will not prove false to him†. Antigone thinks that the laws can be damned, if it means failing her brother. Another cause of moral conflict in the play is the conflict between duties to the gods and duties to the state. Creon stresses to his son Haemon that the former’s will represents the will of the state or Thebes: â€Å"The state, I pray,/It is not reckoned his who governs it?†. As a result, people must follow him, or else political instability will occur. Antigone undermines the need to obey Creon, when she prefers following the laws of the gods. The gods want the dead to be buried properly, so Antigone says: â€Å"Who traced these laws for all the sons of men;/Nor did I dee m thy edicts strong enough,/Coming from mortal man, to set at naught† ... The gods want the dead to be buried properly, so Antigone says: â€Å"Who traced these laws for all the sons of men;/Nor did I deem thy edicts strong enough,/Coming from mortal man, to set at naught† (Sophocles 495-497). For her, mortal laws are inferior to divine laws. The causes of these conflicts are deaths, where Antigone’s death starts a cycle of death in Creon’s family. When Antigone commits suicide, Haemon follows suit. Then, Haemon’s mother kills herself too. In the end, Creon only wanted to punish one woman for her insubordination, and yet he suffered the most, because all his loved ones died. The main causes of moral conflicts are differences in duties and laws. For Antigone, her duty to her family and the gods are more important than her civic duties. Divine laws are heavier for her than man-made laws. Creon, however, insists on the paramount importance of his laws and civic duties. The effects of his decree are deaths and his unhappiness. Work Cited Sophocles. Antigone. Web. 30 Jan. 2012. . Lesson 4 Journal Entry # 1 of 14 Journal Exercise 4.1: Essay Ideas Before you begin the reading for this section, brainstorm possible essay topics. You can choose any issue, situation, or event that catches your interest. Your textbook offers some general possibilities for topics on page 752. You should list at least five possible topics. Journal Entry Some of the five possible topics I have thought about are: 1) Causes and effects of moral conflict 2) Causes and effects of being an individualist 3) Causes and effects of being a ruler 4) Causes and effects of being a woman 5) Causes and effects of being a tyrant Lesson 4 Journal Entry # 2 of 14 Journal Exercise 4.2: Synopsis

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Qualitative Research or Quantitative Research Essay Example for Free

Qualitative Research or Quantitative Research Essay Both qualitative and quantitative research methods have their specific qualities which make them useful to a researcher, however in the course of this short essay I will explain why, for several reasons, qualitative research is better. As both methods operate within different assumptions, it is important to stem criticism for each methods respective theoretical base in order to adequately judge them. In the course of this essay I will highlight each methods theoretical assumptions and then I will assess each method by pointing out their positive and negative factors. The underlying assumption behind qualitative research is that the entire subject needs to be examined in order to understand the phenomenon. Quantitative research however, places importance in collecting and analyzing data from parts of a trend and in so doing, can miss important aspects which could lead to a complete understanding of the whole phenomenon. Theres no such thing as qualitative data. Everything is either 1 or 0(Fred Kerlinger: 1999)Unlike quantitative research, there is no overarching framework for how qualitative research should be conducted; rather each type of qualitative research is guided by the particular philosophical stances that are taken in relation by the research to each phenomenon (Miles Huberman: 1994, p. 40) This enables qualitative research to be more involved with the subject at hand whereas quantitative research has the same rules which it applies to every subject matter, thus making it easier to overlook important evidence. As the researcher using qualitative methods becomes entirely immersed in the data collection phase of the project, he himself actually becoming the data collection tool as opposed to the questionnaires and equipment used by quantitative researchers, it allows him to gain a better understanding of the subject matter as a whole and observe the subject in its own environment:Human behaviour is significantly influenced by the setting in which it occurs; thus one must study that behaviour in situations. The physical setting  ¬e.g., schedules, space, pay, and rewards  ¬and the internalized notions of norms, traditions, roles, and values are crucial contextual variables. Research must be conducted in the setting where all  the contextual variables are operating. (Marshall Rossman: 1980)Quantitative research disregards these valuable contextual variables as most of the work is done in a laboratory with the researcher using the principles of impartiality and an objective portrayal of t he subject. In conclusion, qualitative research is better than quantitative research because it places emphasis upon the subject itself by studying it in an in-depth manner and becoming involved with it on a personal level. Quantitative research keeps a level of impartiality with the subject matter thus making it neglect important contextual factors crucial to the research itself. 1.Using British Election Study data for example, why is it problematic to do quantitative research on ethnic minorities?It is problematic to do quantitative research on ethnic minorities because the standard deviation is so small, thus the observations are spread out over a very small sample which would not accurately represent the entire ethnic group. There is such a small valid percent that subjects would need to be targeted as they are unlikely to be caught during random sampling. 2.Providing either hypothetical and/or published examples, how accurate is it to label content analysis as a quantitative method?It is quite accurate to label content analysis as a quantitative method for several reasons. The comparisons of their theoretical patterns are numerous and therefore it has more in common with quantitative than qualitative methods. In the course of this short essay I will explain why it is accurate to label content analysis as a quantitative method by using an example of research employing content analysis and pointing out the similarities between the two. Content analysis has been described as:Any technique for making inferences by objectively and systematically identifying specified characteristics of messages (Holsti: 1969 p. 14)Compare this with a definition of quantitative research:The aim is to classify features, count them, and construct statistical models in an attempt to explain what is observed. It is objective seeks precise measurement analysis of target concepts. (Miles   Huberman: 1994, p. 40)Both of these definitions contain the term objective, which shows that both of the methods share the core aspect of non-interference with subjects:Content analysis is often referred to as an unobtrusive method'(Bryman: 2008, p. 289)This key concept lies at the heart of both content analysis and quantitative research methods, it is an obvious similarity. In Shephards study of the dynamics between the party, candidates and constituencies he used content analysis on party leaflets to spot recurring trends. His method (content analysis) bears a striking resemblance to quantitative research, for example both methods begin with hypotheses and theories, Shephard choosing to ask whether emphasis in leaflets matches the profile of the constituents. He then made two hypotheses stating that -the higher the unemployment rate the higher the emphasis on jobs and job creation and the higher the home ownership, the higher the emphasis on interest rates and mortgages. Quantitative research methods also start off with hypotheses and theories; therefore it is clear to see that content analysis could be labelled quantitative due to this fact. Furthermore, both methods of research have a high level of transparency because they are both highly structured and systematic in their approach. Shephard stated that to conduct his analysis objectively and systematically (two quantitative features) that he had to identify his sample, sample period, text/images and what words and images to count. This shows that both content analysis and quantitative research share epistemologically grounded beliefs about what constitutes acceptable knowledge (Bryman: 2008, p. 155)In conclusion, it is accurate to label content analysis as a quantitative method due to the fact that it shares many features in common with quantitative research. These include, maintaining objectivity during the study, transparency and a systematic approach to research. These features indicate that content analysis is grounded in the same theoretical processes and philosophy as quantitative research. 3.Providing examples of focus group research from the literature, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of focus groups. Focus groups are a highly useful method of data collection but they have many advantages and disadvantages. I will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of focus groups in this essay and also consider real-life examples of focus group research to illustrate this. Focus groups can provide an insight into the way in which people organize and interpret knowledge as well as how people construe information. This is especially useful in the study of audience reception- how audiences receive different kinds of television and radio programmes, etc. Such a study was conducted by Morley in 1980 into how Nationwide, a popular television programme at the time, was received by specific groups of people. He noticed that different groups had different interpretations of the programmes which they had watched, which indicated that the meaning of the programme was based in the way it was watched and interpreted not in the programme itself. (Bryman: 2008, 475) This provides more information that a simple interview because the interviewee has the choice to respond to fellow participants and argue with them, leading the researcher to gain a greater insight into why they hold such beliefs and how strongly they feel about them. Another advantage of focus groups is that they can provide a more open environment to respond to questions by the way in which they are selected prior to the event. For example, Kitzinger notes in her research on HIV that any attempts at discussions about risks for gay men were blocked out by strong homophobic clamouring amongst homophobic men. (Kitzinger: 1994b in Bloor, et al: 2001, p. 20) Therefore focus groups consisting of specific groups such as male prostitutes, retirement club members, etc, provided a more relaxed environment in which views could be openly discussed without fear of being criticised for ones beliefs. In addition to this, organising groups consisting of only HIV positive people meant that disclosure of a potentially stigmatising status could be overcome. (Bloor: 2001 p. 23)However focus groups also have their disadvantages, the most prominent one being the role of the researcher within the discussion- the way in which the focus group is designed, the participan ts selected to take part, where the meeting takes place, how the questions are worded and delivered and who the instigator is may affect the responses which are obtained. This raises  the question over the validity of the results as the researcher has less control over a focus group than he would over a one on one interview with respondents possibly talking amongst themselves on irrelevant issues, or the simple fact that they may get bored or have personality issues with other members of the group. (Walvis: 2003 p. 405)Another disadvantage of focus groups is the tendency of researchers to (either consciously or subconsciously) pick groups so that they align with pre-determined beliefs about a subject. One famous example of this was when Coca-Cola launched New Coke in 1985 despite the fact that the focus groups had made it explicit that they would not like to see the traditional coke removed from the shelves. (Pendergast: 1993 and Greising: 1998) The taste-tests however had proved positive, but they had not been asked the vital question about how they would feel if traditional coke was removed from the shelves, this positive response was more in line with how the CEO of Coca-Cola felt about the product and it was launched based on the back of poorly conducted focus groups. The subsequent product was a massive failure and lost Coca-Cola a large share of the market; it was obvious that Coca-Cola had spent too much time and money on the plan to dismiss it on the results from focus group research at the last minute. One final disadvantage of focus groups is their limited spread of views; Morgan (1998) suggests that the average size of a group should be around six to ten people. This clearly cannot be representative of the population as a whole- Stephen Fisher and Robert Andersen (2005) state that in order to have a representative sample for one million people you would need, with a margin of error of 5%, 384 participants. Bibliography †¢Bloor, M. et al. (2001) Focus Groups in Social Research (London: Sage). †¢Bryman, A. (2008) Social Research Methods (2nd Ed.) (Oxford: Oxford University Press). †¢Greising, D. (1998) Id Like the World to Buy a Coke: The Life and Leadership of Robert Goizueta (New York: Wiley)†¢Holsti, O.R (1969) Content Analysis for the Social Sciences and Humanities (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley)†¢Kerlinger, F. Foundations of Behavioural Research (Nova York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston 1965)†¢Marshall, C., Rossman, G. (1980). Designing qualitative research. Newbury Park, CA: Sage. †¢Miles Huberman (1994, p. 40). Qualitative Data Analysis†¢Pendergast, M. (1993) For God, Country and Coca-Cola: The Unauthorised history of the Worlds Most Popular Soft Drink (London: Weidenfeld Nicholson)†¢Shephard, M. (2007) Multiple Audiences, Multiple Messages? An Exploration of the Dynamics between the Party, the Candidates and the Various Constituencies, Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties†¢Walvis, T.H (2003), Avoiding advertising research disaster: Advertising and the uncertainty principle, Journal of Brand Management, Vol. 10, No. 6

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Using Technology Supported Learning Essay -- Education, Eatwell Plate

Using Technology Supported Learning The selected topic chosen for the technology supported learning package, supports the learning and teaching of healthy eating. I decided to create an interactive self-assessed food groups package that blends into a lesson on healthy eating. Healthy eating feeds into a lot of the courses I teach; food and nutrition, childcare, personal development and food safety and I wanted to find a different way of making the lesson interesting and informative for my students and myself and at the same time introducing the students to information learning technology, self-directed study and assessment. The target audience were a group of female students attending a local Sure Start Children's Centre. There are seven students on this course and they have had a mixture of formal education, and some training provided by the Children's Centre; several have had very negative experiences at school, and four of the younger students have left school with no GCSE's. All the female students are unemployed; six are single mothers, and one is married. These students have been encouraged by their family support worker to attend this course; so motivation could be a problem as their confidence levels vary and for three of the seven learners, this is the first time they have taken a formal qualification since leaving school. At the start of the course all students were assessed for literacy; there are five at Entry Level 3 and two at Level 1. The group have also been assessed for learning styles, two are kinaesthetic, two are visual, and three are aural oriented learners. A basic computer skills assessment was also carried out and all the students have communicated that they are able to use a computer, navigate... ...; to produce 10 CD's the cost incurred was  £266.49 which makes this an expensive resource to produce on a small scale. The modifications required to improve the resource package, could be completed in minimal time and negotiating a deal on having the package reproduced on a larger scale will reduce the cost. The benefit as a teaching and learning resource allows the students to complete independent study at their own pace, using a technology that they may not have regular access too; it provides the teacher with an innovated way to communicate this subject. Vygotsky (1978) zone of proximal development, suggests "learners can demonstrate and achieve their optimal potential when given some assistance" cited in (Lajoie 2007 p. 29). I feel that the benefits out way the costs of producing this package and the feedback from the students would support this. Using Technology Supported Learning Essay -- Education, Eatwell Plate Using Technology Supported Learning The selected topic chosen for the technology supported learning package, supports the learning and teaching of healthy eating. I decided to create an interactive self-assessed food groups package that blends into a lesson on healthy eating. Healthy eating feeds into a lot of the courses I teach; food and nutrition, childcare, personal development and food safety and I wanted to find a different way of making the lesson interesting and informative for my students and myself and at the same time introducing the students to information learning technology, self-directed study and assessment. The target audience were a group of female students attending a local Sure Start Children's Centre. There are seven students on this course and they have had a mixture of formal education, and some training provided by the Children's Centre; several have had very negative experiences at school, and four of the younger students have left school with no GCSE's. All the female students are unemployed; six are single mothers, and one is married. These students have been encouraged by their family support worker to attend this course; so motivation could be a problem as their confidence levels vary and for three of the seven learners, this is the first time they have taken a formal qualification since leaving school. At the start of the course all students were assessed for literacy; there are five at Entry Level 3 and two at Level 1. The group have also been assessed for learning styles, two are kinaesthetic, two are visual, and three are aural oriented learners. A basic computer skills assessment was also carried out and all the students have communicated that they are able to use a computer, navigate... ...; to produce 10 CD's the cost incurred was  £266.49 which makes this an expensive resource to produce on a small scale. The modifications required to improve the resource package, could be completed in minimal time and negotiating a deal on having the package reproduced on a larger scale will reduce the cost. The benefit as a teaching and learning resource allows the students to complete independent study at their own pace, using a technology that they may not have regular access too; it provides the teacher with an innovated way to communicate this subject. Vygotsky (1978) zone of proximal development, suggests "learners can demonstrate and achieve their optimal potential when given some assistance" cited in (Lajoie 2007 p. 29). I feel that the benefits out way the costs of producing this package and the feedback from the students would support this.

Monday, January 13, 2020

History of Magazines in Kenya

HISTORY OF MAGAZINES IN KENYA Magazines are a form of print media that are printed periodically for a specific group of people with a common interest. Magazine publishing started way back in the 1660s with Erbauliche Monaths-Unterredungen (Edifying Monthly Discussions) being the first magazine to be published in Germany and in the world as a whole. This was in the year 1663. However, the next magazine that followed was much different than the first. The Gentleman’s Magazine published in1731 in England included more entertainment in form of essays, stories, poems and political commentary.Magazines then looked like books, printed in black and white. They were merely a channel where literate men passed on their points in the above mentioned forms of entertainment. In 1739, The Scots Magazine was published and is still published up to date though as a daily business newspaper. In the year 1741, the first magazine in America was published and named American Magazine just three days before Benjamin Franklin’s General Magazine was published. Several magazines were then established until in 1933 when the first men’s magazine, Esquire was published.This was the beginning of special-interest magazines. Further on into the 1950s to 1970s, magazines were inclusive of models gracing their covers. Magazines in Kenya started publishing way back in the 1970s. An example of a magazine published then is Joe Magazine which was founded by Hilary Ng’weno, the publisher and Terry Hirst, the artist. This magazine was full of humour, used art and fiction to narrate cultural, political and social aspects of daily Kenya living. It target was the urban residents but after Ng’weno left in 1974, Hirst tried changing it to include the rural residents as well.However, it lost market and shut down in 1979. Ng’weno however did not end his publishing career there. He did some other publishing works such as Weekly Review, which nurtured important persona lities such as Hanningtone Gaya. In this era of modernity, magazines are grouped into three; * Consumer magazines: these are sold by subscription and at newsstands, in bookstores and supermarkets. * Industrial, company, and sponsored magazines: are produced by companies specifically for their employees, customers and stockholders and by clubs and associations for their members. Trade, professional, and business magazines: carry stories, features and ads aimed at people in specific professions and are either distributed by the professional organizations themselves or by media companies. (Baran) A lot of magazines have come up in Kenya in this century. These are such as the first men’s magazine in Kenya and East Africa known as HM (His Magazine) which is produced by Media Seven Group(Kenya) Limited. This magazine basically aims for men in between 21-40 years of age and it is all about knowledge and insights men could grasp to better their relationships.Media Seven Group also pr oduces Her Magazine, Monthly Motor, Mum and Dad, Teen Life, Business Monthly and G Magazine. Other magazines in Kenya are such as Samantha’s Bridal Weddings Magazine, Passion, Pregnant, True Love, Parents (possibly the oldest magazine), The Insyder, Tupike, and Salon among others. SAMANTHA’S BRIDAL WEDDINGS MAGAZINE Samantha’s Bridal Weddings Magazine is a consumer magazine that is based on weddings and acts as a guide for people planning their weddings. It was started in 2005 by Dr. Catherine Masitsa.The inspiration to begin Samantha’s Bridal Weddings Magazine came from Going Out, a magazine that talked about interesting sites in Kenya. Dr. Catherine Masitsa saw the need for an informative magazine on weddings and all that is involved and thus Samantha’s Bridal Wedding Magazine. However, immediately after Going Out ended, she ventured into Business Woman, another magazine and later Samantha’s Bridal. Samantha’s Bridal Weddings Magazi ne is the first Kenyan wedding magazine and is named so after Dr. Catherine Masitsa’s mother and because it is â€Å"girly† and has a soft touch to it.PERSONNEL People involved in production of Samantha’s Bridal Magazine are editor at large (Catherine Masitsa), sub editor (Christabel Ododa), creative director, contributors, printers, advertising sales executive, advertising sales coordinator, distributors, photographers, models, make-up artists and advertisers. PROCESS AND PERSONNEL ROLES This magazine’s production technically has four stages. Stage one is research. The editorial team comes up with a blueprint which is the rough outline of what the magazines should look like.The Blueprint has the themes, how every page should look like, what should be included and who needs what for the magazine to come up. The editors look for material to write about in connection with the theme, enter contractual agreements with the models and photographers and search f or venues to build up the magazine. The editor is also involved in copyrighting which basically involves coming up with the words of the theme. In the latest issue of Samantha’s Bridal the theme was Dress trends, the writers thus had to look for something to write on dresses.The next stage is the design stage. In this stage is where the sub editor puts together the articles, arranges the articles and puts words in the advertisements. The work is then sent to the designer who lays out the tempo and the photos to come up with an authentic layout. After the designer has done his work its back to the editor for proof reading then to the designer again to prepare the artwork for print in PDF format in cd form to send to local printers and in transfer file protocol to send to international printers. The third stage is printing.The printer makes digital print outs of final look of the magazine which is sent back to the office for approval by the chief editor who has to sign every pa ge. The digital print outs are called proofs. Once the proofs are approved they are sent back to the printers then final printing begins. This process of printing begins when artwork is electronically transformed into a film which is then checked and transformed to the printing plate. The printing plates are then mounted on the web off-set printer which transfers the artwork on paper.Color separation on the papers is done through a process of colors, â€Å"CYMK†. This is cyan, yellow, magenta and black. The pages are mixed with these colors to differentiate between pictures and words. Printing starts with the light colors first and onto the dark colors. The machine sorts the papers from the first to last, binds the magazine and trims it into the size of that particular magazine. The last stage: the distribution of the magazine. Samantha Bridal Magazine uses PDS to distribute their magazine to all their advert clients and to supermarkets all over Kenya.Samantha’s Bridal Magazine produces 10,000 copies each selling at 495 Kenyan shillings. TREND CHANGE * Comparing magazines today and those in the past, there is evidence of a big difference embraced by the magazine industry. * There is use of more graphics and colored images to brighten and liven up the magazines. * Magazine publishers have ventured into the internet to meet the competition posed by other forms of media. * Publishers now are focused on concentrating on their defined audiences rather than the whole multitude. ETHICS Every magazine has a house style that makes it unique and distinct.A house style is the set of standards for the writing and design of an organization. House style identifies a particular company. This is seen in the font size, flow of articles, number of pages, size and layout of magazine. The magazine Industry is very cautious in terms of confidentiality and ethics. This is so in that, when a company wants an advertisement design made for them by the designer; it has to be sent back to the company for its approval. The proof is another example of cautiousness where every page has to be signed to show approval before the printer can go ahead.When a venue for taking photos is chosen the owners of the place have to approve the use of their place as well. Apart from approval by the concerned, magazines rarely face ethical dilemmas in terms of what they write about. This is because, they do not write on real life stories apart from events that have occurred such as parties or dinners. FUNDS Advertisements are what keep a magazine running. Samantha’s Bridal Weddings Magazine has a sales team whose main work is to source for people who want advertisements. The team approaches agencies like Scan group to get companies to advertise with them.A full page advert cost 185,000 and this is basically how a magazine makes money. GOVERNING BODIES AND REGULATORS Government: it offers licenses to the publishing company of the magazine. For instance, Samantha bridals magazine is licensed to produce the magazine and air the TV show. Editorial style book: it governs how the magazine will look like. It is an organizational book that determines the layout of the magazine. THEORY APPLICATION According to Baran, Social Cognitive Theory states that people learn through observation- and applying it to mass media.We either imitate what we see or identify with it. When women look through the magazine, others get ideas of how they would want their weddings to be (imitation) while those who are already married appreciate what they see since they know the feeling (identification). CHALLENGES According to Hanningtone Gaya, publisher of the Media Seven Group magazines, these are the challenges magazine publishers in Kenya face; * Kenyan advertisers do not believe in advertising in magazines, therefore there is no advertising revenue to sustain magazine publishing. Kenyans do not like reading books or magazines, which undermines magazine circulation and subscription. * Most magazine publishers carry very shallow articles which are not well researched. * The magazines appear periodically and therefore disappointing to loyal readers, subscribers and advertisers. * The high cost of printing and poor quality in color printing is a major disadvantage in Kenya. { http://www. gvpedia. com/Kenya/Hanningtone-Gaya-Top-Magazines-Publisher. aspx} REFERENCES www. amanthasbridal. co. ke Stanley Murage- Creative Director, Samantha’s Bridal (0720316292) http://www. infoplease. com/ipea/A0154485. html#ixzz1bQvU4EoQ http://www. media7group. com/component/search/magazines%2Bhistory/%252F? ordering=&searchphrase=all http://en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Joe_%28magazine%29 http://www. gvpedia. com/Kenya/Hanningtone-Gaya-Top-Magazines-Publisher. aspx Baran S. J. , (2010), Introduction to Mass Communication. Media Literacy and Culture, 6th Ed. , McGraw-Hill Companies Inc.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

The Importance Of Ethical And Legal Rights Versus...

Childhood vaccinations have made headlines year after year since the beginning of time. Whether if it’s a moral or legal issue, it’s a safety issue to the public. According to the Centers for Disease Control, a total of 154 cases of the measles were reported in the United States, from January 1, 2015 to February 20, 2015. As of February 23rd, 2015 Sandee LaMotte, a CNN reporter, explained via the Centers for Disease Control has mentioned that the measles outbreak is continuing to grow daily. To address this particular issue is to thoroughly explain the importance of ethical and legal rights versus governmental officials’ laws and regulations. Vaccines are made up of bacteria, viruses or other antigens that are given to stimulate the immune system to create antibodies which will try to prevent future infections with the disease. The importance of vaccinating today’s children is to protect everyone around them and to protect our future generations to come. The CDC issued that 118 of the reported 154 cases are connected to a large, continuous multi-state measles outbreak that started in the Disneyland amusement park in December of 2014. In connection to the Disneyland case, two other ongoing outbreaks are located in Illinois with 14 cases linked to a daycare center, and Nevada that has six cases of the measles. The majority of people who had developed the measles were unvaccinated. In today’s news, it is no secret how Americans’ feel about vaccinating their children. BarbaraShow MoreRelatedHealth Law, Regulation, And Policy1707 Words   |  7 PagesHealth Law, Regulation, and Policy Paper Laws, regulations, and polices are put in place for healthcare to service care to children, woman, adults, and the elderly in delivering quality healthcare through their journey and restoring any health issues if not all, also increasing morbidity rates across America. 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